Hurricane Preparedness

For Everyone

Learn more about how to prepare your family and home before the storm is on its way.

Getting Prepared

Hurricane and Tropical Storm Action Plan

Hurricane Emergency Kit

  • Three-day supply of drinking water and nonperishable food
  • Medical supplies/first-aid kits
  • Two-way radios or cell phones
  • Emergency lighting; flashlights and spare batteries
  • Emergency radio (battery, solar, or crank-powered)
  • Portable pumps and hose
  • Lumber, plywood, nails
  • Hand and power tools
  • Plastic covers and tarpaulins
  • Whistles to signal and direct attention during and after a hurricane
  • Blankets and extra clothing
  • Maintain copies of vital records off site; Save To A Database Like Dropbox So You Can Always Access Them Online.

Hurricane Preparedness Insurance Information

Important Terms

According to international agreement, all cyclone circulation originating over tropical waters are referred to as “tropical cyclones” and are classified by intensity and form:

Tropical Distrubance:

A moving area of thunderstorms in the tropics that maintains its identity for 24 hours or more.

Tropical Depression:

Rotary circulation at the surface, highest constant wind speed 38 mph (33 knots).

Tropical Storm:

Distinct rotary circulation, constant wind speed ranges from 39-73mph (34-63 knots).

Hurricane:

A tropical cyclone with winds of 74mph or greater that is usually accompanied by heavy rain, thunder, lightning, coastal tidal surges and possible tornadoes. These storms are also known as typhoons in the Western Pacific and cyclones in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific Ocean around Australia.

Hurricane Watch:

Issued for a coastal area where there is a threat of hurricane conditions within 24-36 hours.

Hurricane Warning:

Issued when hurricane conditions are expected in a specified coastal area in 24 hours or less. Actions for protection of life and property should begin immediately.

Flash Flood Watch:

A flash flood is possible in the area. Stay alert.

Flash Flood Warning:

A flash flood is imminent. Take immediate action.

Flood Insurance Information

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What To Expect

Hurricane Information

The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a measurement scale of hurricane wind and ocean surge intensity ranging from 1 to 5. Category 1 is a weak hurricane and Category 5 is the most intense.

Very dangerous winds will produce some damage. Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding, and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.

Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage. Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous toads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.

Devastating damage will occur. Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.

Catastrophic damage will occur. Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles down. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Catastrophic damage will occur. A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be inhabitable for weeks or months.

For More Information on Hurricanes

National Weather Service: https://www.weather.gov/

FEMA: https://www.fema.gov/

Centers for Disease Control Hurricanes and Other Tropical Storms: https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/index.html

National Hurricane Center: https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

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